Lacking Leadership Engagement in your Fundraising?

This is sadly the case for many charitable organisations, resulting in limited or misguided investment in fundraising, perpetuating a wariness of fundraising when results are not as expected. It can also mean that support from other departments is limited, as the standard for internal communication comes from the top. If Directors aren’t talking to each other and non-Fundraising senior staff do not understand the importance of fundraising, then your potential to succeed will be severely hampered. All of us at Money Tree have experienced good and bad leadership in the sector and learnt valuable lessons. It can be tough in a non-fundraising organisational culture, but we can work with you to integrate and demonstrate the value of committed organisational fundraising. We can help you overcome this major obstacle by: • Providing a fundraising audit to assess your strengths and weaknesses and highlight areas of opportunity • Working alongside you during a period of consultancy to recommend a fundraising strategy that works for your charity, including workplans and recommendations on resourcing • Coaching fundraisers and leaders on strategic fundraising, major donor fundraising, trust fundraising and fundraising management • Running a workshop for leaders within your charity to explain fundraising methods and the role they can play in ensuring success Do not suffer in silence! The fastest way to grow your income is to get senior leaders in your charity to understand and engage in fundraising. Speak to us to help you make this shift in your...

Remember what your donor gave you money for!

We often speak to donors introduced to us by charities we work with. We suggest this as a great way to get honest insight into what their donors think of their cause, their communications, their way of asking for money, their point of contact at the charity, funding needs, etc. Contrary to popular belief, we get a great take up from donors, who are pleased to be ask their opinion. We are then able to feed back to the charity the views of their donors, summarising any key points that will enable them to improve their donor contact, keep their donors happier and consequently raise more money. There are many insights from donors that pop up time and again. One of the ones that sticks with me from lapsed donors, in particular, is that charities seem to forget what they gave their money to in the first place. This could fall under the banner of that oft-bandied around term, ‘impact’, but it is more specific than that and less onerous to get right. The example I tend to quote is of an environmental charity who better wanted to understand why some of their best donors had stopped giving. The answer soon became clear – the charity was good at informing donors what it was doing now, what it hoped to do and what good a donation could do – what it got wrong was not reporting back to the donor on what good their particular donation had done. You could argue that this is hard to achieve, but is it really? Major donors more often than not give restricted...

Why GDPR is good for your major donor fundraising

As consultants in high value fundraising, we are often being asked how GDPR will affect major donor fundraising. The question is also being asked, including in a recent edition of Fundraising magazine, whether this is the end of major donor fundraising all together. The answer is yes, it will be affected, but it most definitely is not the death knell for this most profitable area of fundraising. My reasoning is that major donor fundraising is merely a case of looking after your best supporters as well as you can. It is not about endless research, wealth screening and invading privacy – it is about having more conversations with your donors and giving them a strong reason to give. This is my issue with the established 7 steps of major donor fundraising; it suggests that you can’t move forwards until you’ve been through an intensive research stage – that removing this stage will quash any plans you had of donor stewardship and securing large donations – this is nonsense, frankly, particularly as your best donors are already giving. Consider, if you will, substituting the word ‘research’ for ‘segmentation’; the process of sorting and filtering your donors by largest and most recent gifts – this may seem obvious, but seems to be an anathema to many charities. Indeed, we have charity clients who refuse to do this, despite forms of segmentation existing in their direct mail programme. The next step is to select a number of top tier supporters and contact them – simple! Coming back to the GDPR mindset, you clearly only contact opted-in supporters and you don’t ask them...

What’s wrong with the 7 steps of major donor fundraising?

The 7 steps of major donor fundraising make a lot of sense – but they operate in a vacuum – in essence they do not give you anything to fix or improve. What are the 3 key areas that you need to be strong in to have a successful major donor programme and what are the key questions you need to ask yourself?

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